Seminars & Events >> Autumn Term 2016 >>

Programme of Studies 2016 – 2017

AUTUMN TERM 2016

Final date for receipt of applications 5 September 2016.

 

1. ARCHETYPES AND COMPLEXES: FROM JUNG TO THE PRESENT

Patricia Skar

Date Thursday 22 September

Time 7.30pm-9.30pm

Cost £35

Subjects covered: Fundamentals; History of Neurosis; Individuation; Developmental Models; Post-Jungian Theory and Practice

There has always been confusion and disagreement about the nature of the terms archetype and complex in Jungian circles, not to mention non-Jungian ones. A recent concern is whether Jung’s concept of the archetype and complex can be justified in terms of current scientific research, most notably that of neurophysiologists and others interested in the brain and consciousness. This lecture will review the evolution of Jungian thought about archetypes and complexes and examine the latest developments in the field, including the idea of the archetype as an emergent property of the activity of the brain/mind.

Reading:

Jacobi, J., Complex/Archetype/Symbol in the Psychology of C.G. Jung, New York: Bollingen Foundation, Inc., Princeton University Press (1959)

Jung, C.G., Collected Works, Vol. 8, On the Nature of the Psyche, §§397-420

Jung, C.G., Collected Works, Vol. 8, A Review of the Complex Theory, §§194-219

Knox, J., Archetype, Attachment, Analysis, Hove & New York: Brunner-Routledge (2003), Chapters 1-3

Saunders, P.T. and Skar, P., ‘Archetypes, complexes and self-organization’, Journal of Analytical Psychology, 46 (2001): 305–323

Skar, P., ‘Chaos and self-organization: emergent patterns at critical life transitions’, Journal of Analytical Psychology, 49 (2004): 243–262

Stevens, A., Archetype: A Natural History of the Self, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul (1982)

 

2. FACING THE SHADOW DURING THE INDIVIDUATION PROCESS IN ANALYSIS

Dr Svetlana Zdravkovic

Date Friday 23 September, Saturday 24 September

Time Friday 7.30-9.30pm

Saturday 10.30am-12.30pm, 2pm-4pm

Cost £105

Subjects covered: Individuation, Psychopathology, Fundamentals, Post Jungian Theory and Practice, Culture and Diversity.

The presenter will discuss the Jungian notion of Shadow - both as the individual and as the collective image. Theoretical parts of the presentation will be interwoven with much clinical material from the lecturer`s practice. In addition, some cultural amplifications will be made. The connection will be made to images of the Shadow in literature and other art modalities. During the workshop, students will have the opportunity to explore, through active imagination, their own relationship with the Shadow complex. The participants will be working with clay and other creatively expressive media.

Reading:

Jung, C.G., Collected Works, Vol. 9ii, The Shadow, §§13-19.

Papadopoulos, R., (ed.), ‘The Shadow’ in The Handbook of Jungian Psychology, London and New York: Routledge (2006), pp. 94-113.

Zweig, C., Wolf, S., Romancing the Shadow, New York: The Random House Publishing Group (1997)

 

3. PSYCHOLOGICAL TYPES

Penny Boisset

Date Thursday 27 October

Time 7.30-9.30pm

Cost £35

Subjects covered: Fundamentals, Individuation

The concept of psychological types is one of the most widely known aspects of Jung’s work. Jung proposed four functions of consciousness, which Hillman called “four modes of organizing and suffering life”. Von Franz said that an understanding of typology is a form of diplomacy. This seminar will explore the significance of typology, and especially the role of the inferior function, in analytic work and everyday life.

Reading:

Jung, C.G., Collected Works, Vol. 6: Psychological Types, §§ 556-671, §§ 883-959

Von Franz, M-L & Hillman, J., Lectures on Jung’s Typology, Putnam, Connecticut: Spring Publications (1986)

 

4. READING SEMINAR: JUNG’S ZARATHUSTRA SEMINARS

Mariolina Graziosi

Date Friday 28 October, Saturday 29 October

Time Friday 7.30-9.30pm

Saturday 10.30am-12.30pm, 2pm-4pm

Cost £105

Subjects Covered: Individuation, Cultural Aspects of Analytical Psychology

In 1934, Jung began his weekly seminars on Nietzsche’s Thus Spake Zarathustra, only stopping them in 1939, with the onset of the Second World War. This reading seminar will use the abridged version of the transcriptions from the Zarathustra seminars and will address a series of questions which are fundamental to depth psychology: the relationship between the personality of an author and his work; the connection between individual consciousness and the collective unconscious; the connection of collective consciousness to history, and how the process of individuation is related to Nietzsche’s idea of becoming oneself.

Reading:

Jung, C.G., Jung’s Seminar on Nietzsche’s ‘Zarathustra’, Abridged edition by James Jarrett, Bollingen Series XCIX, Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press (1997)

Nietzsche, F., Thus Spake Zarathustra, London: Penguin Classics (1972)

 

5. FAIRY TALES AND MYTHS IN OUR TIME

Francesca Ahmed

Date Thursday 24 November

Time 7.30 – 9.30pm

Cost £35

Subjects Covered: Fairy Tale and Myth, Fundamentals, Archetypes

The aim of the seminar is to explore how myths and fairy tales are the direct expression of the collective unconscious. The archetypal dimension of myths and fairy tales offer a clear understanding of the basic patterns of the human psyche, making them relevant for us today in our everyday life, inside and outside the consulting room. 

Reading:

Von Franz, M.L., The Interpretation of Fairy Tales, Boston: Shambhala (1996)

Von Franz, M.L., Archetypal Patterns in Fairy Tales, Toronto: Inner City Books (1997) 

 

6. THE TRICKSTER FIGURE

Mark Saban

Date Friday 25 November, Saturday 26 November

Time Friday 7.30-9.30pm

Saturday 10.30am-12.30pm, 2pm-4pm

Cost £105

Subjects covered: Fairy tale and myth, Alchemy, Cultural aspects of Analytical Psychology, Transference and Countertransference

These seminars will start by tackling Jung’s 1953-4 text, The Psychology of the Trickster Figure, and then move on to a wider engagement with trickster motifs in Jung’s life and psychology, with special reference to the figure of Hermes/Mercurius. This will lead to a discussion of trickster phenomena in clinical work.

Reading:

Jung, C. G., Collected Works, Vol, 9i ‘The Psychology of the Trickster Figure’ §456-488

The Homeric Hymn to Hermes (there are numerous translations – any will do)

Beebe, J., ‘The Trickster in the Arts’, The San Francisco Jung Institute Library Journal, Vol. 2/No.2, Winter (1981) 

Radin, P., The Trickster: A Study in American Indian Mythology, New York: Schocken (1987)

Hyde, L., Trickster Makes this World, Farrar, New York: Straus and Giroux (1998) (especially Part 3: Dirt Work)

Lopez-Pedraza, R., Hermes and his Children, Einsiedeln: Daimon Verlag (1989) (especially Chapter 2: The Homeric Hymn to Hermes)

Hynes, W. & Doty, W., Mythical Trickster Figures: Contours, Contexts and Criticisms, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (1993) (especially Chapter 2: Historical Overview of Theoretical Issues: The Problem of the Trickster by William G. Doty and William J. Hynes and Chapter 13: Inconclusive Conclusions: Tricksters – Metaplayers and Revealers by William J. Hynes)

 

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