Seminars & Events >> Spring Term 2017 >>

Programme of Studies 2016 – 2017

SPRING TERM 2017

Final date for receipt of applications 6 January 2017.

 

7. THE THIEF

Janet Atkins

Date Thursday 26 January

Time 7.30-9.30pm

Cost £35

Subjects covered: Mythology and Fairy Tales, Alchemy, Fundamentals

The image of the thief appears frequently in dreams. In Vol 14 Jung speaks of the ‘vile’ thief but in myths and stories, to which he also refers, it is clear that the thief is not always vile. Sometimes the act of stealing or being stolen from is the beginning of new insight and awareness. This seminar will explore different aspects of the thief through dreams, mythology and stories.

Reading:

Jung C.G., Collected Works, Vol. 14, The Personification of the Opposites §§ 189-213

The Homeric Hymns: The Hymn to Hermes, ed. M.L. West, Harvard USA: Harvard University Press, Loeb Edition (2003)

Or The Homeric Hymns: The Hymn to Hermes, translation by Jules Cashford, London: Penguin Books (2003)

Jung, E., Animus and Anima, Chapter 1: On the Nature of the Animus, Washington USA: Spring Publications (1998)

 

8a. WHY DO WE STUDY FAIRY TALES?

Jane Bacon, Sybil Fuller, Myfanwy Rees, Dr. Brian Stevenson

Date Friday 27 January

Time 7.30-9.30pm

Cost £35

Subjects covered: Fairy Tales

Fairy tales help us to understand psyche. In this seminar we explore Classical Jungian as well as several other approaches to the understanding of fairy tales.

Reading:

Jung, C.G. Collected Works, Vol. 9i The Phenomenology of the Spirit in Fairy Tales, §§ 384-455

Von Franz, M-L, Shadow and Evil in Fairy Tales, Spring Publications, Inc. (1974)

 

8b. FAIRY TALE INTERPRETATION IN PRACTICE

Jane Bacon, Sybil Fuller, Myfanwy Rees, Dr. Brian Stevenson

Date Saturday 28 January

Time 10.30am-12.30pm, 2pm-4pm

Cost £70

Subjects Covered: Fairy Tales, Archetypes, Individuation, Pathology

IGAP Members in the Midlands established a Fairy tale study group in 2007 which meets monthly. Interactive reflection in a small group of colleagues with differing life experiences interests and typology has proved particularly rewarding. Our experience has been that getting immersed in a Fairy Tale enriches theoretical understanding of psyche and illuminates clinical practice. This way of working can be described as follows:  

We begin by reading the tale aloud and then wait to see what happens. Any reactions for eg thoughts, associations, intuitions emotions, physical sensations, and memories are shared. One observation will spark off a few more and gradually a psychological situation emerges in which we can often see the inherent archetypes at work.

Morning Session: A Demonstration by the Study Group

Group members will read and discuss a Fairy Tale exactly as they do in the monthly study group. They will not know before the seminar which tale has been chosen for study. The choice will be made by the Coordinator for Studies. Suggestions for a Grimms’ Fairy Tale to be explored in the demonstration discussion are most welcome. Please send the IGAP Office. The chosen tale should contain archetypal and symbolic material.   

Afternoon Session:  

This experiential day is designed as a ‘taster’. Following the demonstration, in the afternoon session, you will be invited to work similarly in small facilitated groups. Please bring any favourite Fairy Tales you might like to have discussed. 

Reading:

For preparation we suggest that you read two or three Fairy Tales and if possible discuss them with colleagues. 

We will be reading from:

Zipes, J., The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, Woodstock, England: Princeton University Press (2015)  

Please bring a copy of Grimm's Fairy Tales with you to the seminar, preferably Zipes, otherwise whatever you use.

 

9. SHAMANIC THEMES AND INDIVIDUATION

Sarah Halford

Date Thursday 23 February

Time 7.30-9.30pm

Cost £35

Subjects covered: Fairy tale and Myth, Dreams, Psychology and Religion, Individuation, Anthropology, Cultural aspects of Analytical Psychology

This talk will explore dreams and symptoms arising during the process of analysis, and the accounts given by initiates from several shamanic traditions.

Reading:

Eliade, M., Shamanism: Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy, Princeton: Princeton University Press (1964)

Halifax, J., Shamanic Voices: A Survey of Visionary Narratives, New York: Penguin (1979)

Jung, C.G., Red Book, New York: WW Norton (2009)

 

10 THE COSMOGRAPHY OF MYSELF: LANDSCAPES OF THE UNCONSCIOUS

Josephine Evetts-Secker

Date Friday 24 February, Saturday 25 February

Time Friday 7.30-9.30pm

Saturday 10.30am-12.30pm, 2pm-4pm

Cost £105

Subjects covered: Fairy Tale and Myth, Individuation, Cultural Aspects of Analytical Psychology, Dreams

Through dream, myth, fairy tale, painting and poetry we will explore experiences of personal inner geographies as well as collective, cultural ones. Each of us carries an individual atlas containing unique inner territories where complexes reside or visit.

Reading:

Ovid, Metamorphoses, any translation

Grimm Brothers, Household Tales, any edition

Homer, The Homeric Hymns, any translation.

Extra reading will be suggested as we travel.

 

11. APPROACHES TO THE SACRED: NAVAHO SAND PAINTING

Sarah Halford

Date Thursday 23 March

Time 7.30-9.30pm

Cost £35

Subjects covered: Fairy Tale and Myth, Fundamentals, Psychology and Religion, Individuation, Cultural Aspects of Analytical Psychology, Transference and Countertransference.

This talk will explore the archetypal religious impulse as it becomes manifest through myths and images surrounding the ancient tradition of Navaho sand painting.

Reading:

Sandner, D. Navaho Symbols of Healing: A Jungian Exploration of Ritual, Image and Medicine, Rochester, VT USA: Healing Arts Press (1991)

Silko, L. Marmon. Ceremony, London: Penguin Books (1977)

 

12. JUNG, THE RED BOOK, AND THE INNER JOURNEY: FINDING MEANING IN PERSONAL SUFFERING

Gill Kind

Date Friday 24 March, Saturday 25 March

Time Friday 7.30-9.30pm

Saturday 10.30am-12.30pm, 2pm-4pm

Cost £105

Subjects covered: Individuation, Psychology and Religion, Cultural Aspects of Analytical Psychology, Psychopathology.

This will be a lecture/seminar weekend on the contribution C G Jung has made to the understanding of personal suffering, including reading and discussion of some of the passages in the Red Book which refer to his relationship with the Christian God Image and how we may need to relate to it in the future. In the context of a clinical setting, it will include a look at the connection to shadow/Shadow, individual responsibility, individuation and the current spiritual and psychological crises including the relevance of the sacrifice of the hero and the heroic attitude.  

Reading:

Jung, C.G., The Red Book, Liber Novus, ed. S. Shamdasani, New York and London: W.W. Norton (2009)

Jung, C.G., Memories Dreams Reflections, Glasgow: Fontana Press (1993)

Edinger, E. F., The New God Image, Ashville, USA: Chiron Publications (1996)

Corbett, L., The Sacred Cauldron, Ashville, USA: Chiron Publications (2011)

You Tube Rel 502 New Myth of God – Lionel Corbett: University of Philosophical Research

Lance Owen Red Book Lectures http://www.gnosis.org/redbook/index.html

 

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