EVENT

13. THE POLZEATH SEMINARS

Friday, March 26, 2021

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6:30 pm

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8:30 pm

Saturday, March 27, 2021

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9:30 am

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11:30 am

Saturday, March 27, 2021

|

12:30 pm

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2:30 pm

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-

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HOST

Diane Zervas Hirst and Gill Kind

DATE & TIME

Friday, March 26, 2021

6:30 pm

-

8:30 pm

SESSION 2

Saturday, March 27, 2021

9:30 am

-

11:30 am

SESSION 3

Saturday, March 27, 2021

12:30 pm

-

2:30 pm

SESSION 4

-

COST

£105

LOCATION

Online

RELATED EVENT

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SUBJECTS COVERED

Fundamentals, Psychology of Religion, History of Neurosis, Transference and Countertransference

DESCRIPTION

In the summer of 1923, Jung held a fascinating seminar at Polzeath, Cornwall for an intimate group of colleagues and students. They summarised many of his latest ideas which were the fruit of his break with Freud and his encounter with The Red Book. Esther Harding’s outline notes for this seminar serve as a guide to explore Jung’s use of the transference at this time, and the importance of nature, the animal, inferior man, and creative fantasy, which he felt had been excluded by the Christian era. Together with excerpts from some earlier writings, the Polzeath seminars highlight the centrality of the transference in the analytic process as Jung had developed it by 1923.

READING

Polzeath seminar: Esther Harding’s typescript outline (to be sent to students as a PDF)

Selected Readings. Excerpts from the following essays:

1912: ‘The Theory of Psychoanalysis,’ in Collected Works, Vol. 4

1913: ‘Crucial Points in Psychoanalysis,’ in Collected Works, Vol. 4

1916: ‘Transcendent Function,’ in Collected Works Vol. 8

1916: ‘Adaptation, Individuation and Collectivity,’ in Collected Works, Vol. 18

1917: ‘The Psychology of the Unconscious Processes.’ In Collected Papers on Analytical Psychology, Ed. Constance E. Long. 2nd edition. New York: Moffat, Yard. (1921)

1921: ‘Therapeutic Value of Abreaction’ in Collected Works Vol. 16

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY

View the biography here >